Blog in Spanish

Thanksgiving Day cooking fires are triple the number of cooking fires on an average day.

See the pan on fire:

Here’s what happens when you try to put out the fire with water:

The pan fire explodes.

Stand by your pan. In the event of a fire:

Cover the pan with a lid to smother the flames.
Turn off the stove.
Call 911.
Do NOT use water or flour on the fire. They can make the fire worse.
Keep an extinguisher nearby and use it if necessary.

Similarly, (…)

Read More image Nov 15

Blog in Spanish

Who doesn’t love fall Time Change Sunday? We get an extra hour. What are you going to do with your newfound time?

Here’s a thought: When you wake and find yourself with that extra hour, change all of the batteries in your smoke and CO alarms. Talk about time well spent.

Yes, it’s that important safety time of year, when we government folks, along with fire and other safety officials around the country, recommend that you spend some time focused on safety. There’s (…)

Read More image Oct 30

Fireplaces are a symbol of a warm and welcoming home. But using them improperly can lead to tragedies.

Tragedies involving fires pull at our heartstrings — like the Christmas morning fire that tragically killed three children and their grandparents in Stamford, Conn.  (Source: Ct. Post)

According to the Connecticut Post, the family had used their fireplace that day. Stamford, Ct.’s chief fire marshal told the Ct. Post that the initial investigation determined that the fireplace ashes and (…)

Read More image Dec 29

BEEEEEEEP! BEEEEEEEP!

That’s the sound you want to hear if there’s a fire in your home. Unfortunately, too many people never hear an alarm.

We estimate that nearly 2,400 people die each year because of unintentional home fires. About two-thirds of these fire deaths occur in homes with no smoke alarms or with smoke alarms that don’t work, perhaps because someone has removed the battery and forgotten to replace it. A smoke alarm’s warning can cut the risk of dying from a fire in your (…)

Read More image Oct 12

        Through our work at CPSC, we encounter many tragedies. We see injuries and deaths due to lacerations, poisonings, drownings, strangulations, blunt trauma, and other causes. Incidents involving children are the most heart-breaking and continue to motivate me, my fellow commissioners, and the staff to make the home a safer place for every American, young and old.

More lives are lost and more homes are destroyed by fire than any other hazard. According to the National Fire Protection (…)

Read More image Oct 8